25 years of child rights in South Asia

On 20 November 1989, the world agreed that the fundamental human rights of children needed
to be protected. The resulting Convention on the Rights of the Child, the most rapidly
and widely signed human rights treaty in history, is the world’s promise to its children.

Despite economic growth over the past 25 years, strong inequalities persist and children pay a heavy price.

WHAT IS STOPPING US FROM ENDING VIOLENCE AGAINST GIRLS AND WOMEN?

What is stopping us from ending violence against girls and women? The answer is our mindset. We need to change it. We need to see women as citizens who can make decisions that can impact their own lives.

Shining a light on the issues

How have the lives of children changed over the last 25 years in the eight countries of South Asia?

The 25th anniversary on the Convention on the Rights of the Child
provides a unique opportunity to look at where children’s rights stand in South Asia.

Afghanistan

Girls’ education

Bangladesh

Birth Registration

India

Nutrition
 

Nepal

Sanitation
 

Maternal and Child Health

Pakistan is a country with a fairly high rate of maternal and child mortality. One of the reasons is lack of SBAs, especially, in remote rural areas. In collaboration with the Health Department, Punjab and some development partners, UNICEF initiated a training program for SBAs in various district hospitals in 2005.
The objective of the programme was to train young women belonging to rural communities so that they acquire the skill and start their own maternity practice within their communities.

Events

Media event – Kathmandu

9 October 2014

Goodwill Ambassador Aamir Khan

Conference – New Delhi

10-12 November 2014

Stop Stunting Regional conference

Media event – Kathmandu

20 November 2014

Goodwill Ambassador Sachin Tendulkar

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